Museums

The Captian Cook Museum is open daily from March to end October and half term weekends in February. It is located in the 17th century house on Whitby’s harbour where the young James Cook lodged as apprentice after moving here from his birth place in Marton, Middlesbrough. It was in Whitby that Captain Cook trained as a seaman, leading to his epic voyages of discovery. The museum has unveiled a forgotten collection of treasures from the Endeavour and offers a variety of souvenirs, with something to suit every pocket, from pencils and postcards to books or pictures. A great place to spend an afternoon or morning for those interested in this maritime legend.

http://www.cookmuseumwhitby.co.uk/

The Captain Cook Birthplace Museum is housed in a purpose-built building close to the granite urn marking the site of Cook’s birthplace cottage in the lovely Stewart Park, Marton, Middlesbrough. It is around a 25 min drive from WhitbyApartment.com and is served by a regular bus service. The museum tells the story of one of the world’s greatest navigators and mariners through themed display galleries, temporary exhibitions, associated activities and events and a lively education programme. There is full disabled access throughout, gift/book shop, and a café. Stewart Park covers about 120 acres Woodland, parkland, and an extensive pets for the kids.

http://www.captcook-ne.co.uk/ccbm/index.htm

Whitby Lifeboat Museum. Built in 1895, the double boathouse was used by the RNLI until 1957 when it was re-established as a museum. The museum has grown to contain an abundance of lifeboat material including models, paintings, medals, photographs, lifeboat kit and items from famous rescues. Personal tales of individual RNLI crew and survivors are told through individual accounts from the archives and touching mementos from the wrecked and the rescued.

The display features the historic Robert and Ellen Robson – a pulling and sailing, self righting lifeboat built in 1919. The museum also includes information on famous Coxswains Henry Freeman and Tom Langlands. Admission is free but donations welcome.

http://www.rnli.org.uk/who_we_are/the_heritage_trust/whitby

Situated on Flowergate The Sutcliffe Gallery shows many photographs taken in and around Whitby by the World famous photographer Frank Meadow Sutcliffe (Hon. F.R.P.S.) between 1875 and 1910. Taken with his large camera made of mahogany with brass fittings his photographs give a interesting historical account of life in and around Whitby in Victorian times.

http://www.sutcliffe-gallery.co.uk/